Category Archives: Art

Graffiti Art

Graffiti are writing or drawings that have been scribbled, scratched, or painted illicitly on a wall or other surface, often within public view. Graffiti range from simple written words to elaborate wall paintings, and they have existed since ancient times, with examples dating back to Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, and the Roman Empire. In modern times, paint (particularly spray paint) and marker pens have become the most commonly used graffiti materials. In most countries, marking or painting property without the property owner’s permission is considered defacement and vandalism, which is a punishable crime.

Graffiti may also express underlying social and political messages and a whole genre of artistic expression is based upon spray paint graffiti styles. Within hip hop culture, graffiti have evolved alongside hip hop music, b-boying, and other elements. Unrelated to hip-hop graffiti, gangs use their own form of graffiti to mark territory or to serve as an indicator of gang-related activities. Controversies that surround graffiti continue to create disagreement amongst city officials, law enforcement, and writers who wish to display and appreciate work in public locations. There are many different types and styles of graffiti; it is a rapidly developing art form whose value is highly contested and reviled by many authorities while also subject to protection, sometimes within the same jurisdiction.

The modern-day graffiti artist can be found with an arsenal of various materials that allow for a successful production of a piece. This includes such techniques as scribing. However, spray paint in aerosol cans is the number one medium for graffiti. From this commodity comes different styles, technique, and abilities to form master works of graffiti. Spray paint can be found at hardware and art stores and comes in virtually every color. Stencil graffiti, originating in the early 1980s (Blek le Rat, Jef Aerosol, Speedy Graphito, Miss Tic…) is created by cutting out shapes and designs in a stiff material (such as cardboard or subject folders) to form an overall design or image. The stencil is then placed on the “canvas” gently and with quick, easy strokes of the aerosol can, the image begins to appear on the intended surface. This method of graffiti is popular amongst artists because of its swift technique that requires very little time. Time is always a factor with graffiti artists due to the constant threat of being caught by law enforcement.

Graffiti artists constantly have the looming threat of facing consequences for displaying their graffiti. Many choose to protect their identities and reputation by remaining anonymous. With the commercialization of graffiti (and hip hop in general), in most cases, even with legally painted “graffiti” art, graffiti artists tend to choose anonymity. This may be attributed to various reasons or a combination of reasons. Graffiti still remains the one of four hip hop elements that is not considered “performance art” despite the image of the “singing and dancing star” that sells hip hop culture to the mainstream. Being a graphic form of art, it might also be said that many graffiti artists still fall in the category of the introverted archetypal artist. Pixnit is another artist who chooses to keep her identity from the general public. Her work focuses on beauty and design aspects of graffiti as opposed to Banksy’s anti-government shock value. Her paintings are often of flower designs above shops and stores in her local urban area of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Some store owners endorse her work and encourage others to do similar work as well. “One of the pieces was left up above Steve’s Kitchen, because it looks pretty awesome”- Erin Scott, the manager of New England Comics in Allston, Massachusetts.

Doodle

A doodle is a drawing made while a person’s attention is otherwise occupied. Doodles are simple drawings that can have concrete representational meaning or may just be composed of random and abstract lines, generally without ever lifting the drawing device off of the paper, in which case it is usually called a “scribble”.

Doodling and scribbling are most often associated with young children and toddlers, because their lack of hand–eye coordination and lower mental development often make it very difficult for any young child to keep their coloring attempts within the line art of the subject. Despite this, it is not uncommon to see such behaviour with adults, in which case it generally is done jovially, out of boredom. Typical examples of doodling are found in school notebooks, often in the margins, drawn by students daydreaming or losing interest during class. Other common examples of doodling are produced during long telephone conversations if a pen and paper are available. Popular kinds of doodles include cartoon versions of teachers or companions in a school, famous TV or comic characters, invented fictional beings, landscapes, geometric shapes, patterns and textures.

The word doodle first appeared in the early 17th century to mean a fool or simpleton. It may derive from the German Dudeltopf or Dudeldop, meaning simpleton or noodle (literally “nightcap”). It is the origin of the early eighteenth century verb to doodle, meaning “to swindle or to make a fool of”. The modern meaning emerged in the 1930s either from this meaning or from the verb “to dawdle”, which since the seventeenth century has had the meaning of wasting time or being lazy. In the 1936 film Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, in the final courtroom scene, the main character, addressing the judge, introduces the word ‘doodler’ – which the judge has not heard before – as “a name we made up back home to describe a person who makes foolish designs on paper when they’re thinking.” This is clearly not a word in common usage at that time, and the inference is that it is an invented word that no one outside the character’s fictional home town of Mandrake Falls would be expected to know. Perhaps the word ‘doodle’, used here in its modern sense of ‘an absent-minded design on paper’, was not entirely new and was not actually invented by the scriptwriter, Robert Riskin, but it seems likely that at the very least this film greatly assisted the word into common usage.

Geometric abstraction

Geometric abstraction is a form of abstract art based on the use of geometric forms sometimes, though not always, placed in non-illusionistic space and combined into non-objective (non-representational) compositions. Although the genre was popularized by avant-garde artists in the early twentieth century, similar motifs have been used in art since ancient times. Geometric abstraction is present among many cultures throughout history both as decorative motifs and as art pieces themselves. Islamic art, in its prohibition of depicting religious figures, is a prime example of this geometric pattern-based art, which existed centuries before the movement in Europe and in many ways influenced this Western school. Aligned with and often used in the architecture of Islamic civilations spanning the 7th century-20th century, geometric patterns were used to visually connect spirituality with science and art, both of which were key to Islamic thought of the time.

How to Do a Cubist Style Painting

Pick kid friendly art materials. You want to choose materials that kids will find easy to work with and that won’t create a large mess.

  • Washable acrylic paints work well for painting with kids. You can also create a “painting” masterpiece with markers, crayons, or colored pencils.
  • Choose a large sheet of art paper or a notebook of paper to make your Cubist style painting.
  • You’ll also need paint brushes, and a pencil and eraser.

Choose the subject for your piece. This could be something simple like a vase of flowers or even a single flower. You’ll first draw this subject, and then use lines to break it up.

  • Choose something you have on hand. You want to practice drawing from life instead of just drawing from your imagination.
  • Practice making small sketches of your subject in a sketchbook. You want to decade exactly how you will draw it for your final painting.

Sketch your final subject drawing on your art paper. You should draw lightly with your pencil so that if you make a mistake, you can erase it and start again.

  • As you are sketching, remember that your drawing doesn’t have to be completely realistic.
  • It’s okay to overlap lines and exaggerate features. You’re just going to make it even more abstract.

Break up bigger shapes in your drawing. Use a pencil and a ruler to draw straight lines in all directions. Use your creativity to decide where to place them.

  • You don’t want large areas of blank space in your drawing.
  • You also don’t want to create too many areas with a bunch of tiny geometric shapes.

Paint the shapes in your drawing. You want to paint each of the sections you created individually. Experiment with using your brush in different directions to create texture.

  • Use black or brown paint to create thin outlines around the shapes you made.
  • Try to stick to using only a few different colors.

Display your creation. Add any final touches, and remember to sign your name on the bottom of your Cubist style painting.

  • These paintings make great decorations for children’s bedrooms.
  • They are also good gifts for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, or Grandparents’ Day.

Romanticism

Romanticism (also the Romantic era or the Romantic period) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Romanticism was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical. It was partly a reaction to the Industrial Revolution, the aristocratic social and political norms of the Age of Enlightenment, and the scientific rationalization of nature—all components of modernity. It was embodied most strongly in the visual arts, music, and literature, but had a major impact on historiography, education, and the natural sciences. It had a significant and complex effect on politics, and while for much of the Romantic period it was associated with liberalism and radicalism, its long-term effect on the growth of nationalism was perhaps more significant.

The movement emphasized intense emotion as an authentic source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as apprehension, horror and terror, and awe—especially that experienced in confronting the new aesthetic categories of the sublimity and beauty of nature. It elevated folk art and ancient custom to something noble, but also spontaneity as a desirable characteristic (as in the musical impromptu). In contrast to the Rationalism and Classicism of the Enlightenment, Romanticism revived medievalism and elements of art and narrative perceived as authentically medieval in an attempt to escape population growth, early urban sprawl, and industrialism.

Although the movement was rooted in the German Sturm und Drang movement, which preferred intuition and emotion to the rationalism of the Enlightenment, the events and ideologies of the French Revolution were also proximate factors. Romanticism assigned a high value to the achievements of “heroic” individualists and artists, whose examples, it maintained, would raise the quality of society. It also promoted the individual imagination as a critical authority allowed of freedom from classical notions of form in art. There was a strong recourse to historical and natural inevitability, a Zeitgeist, in the representation of its ideas. In the second half of the 19th century, Realism was offered as a polar opposite to Romanticism. The decline of Romanticism during this time was associated with multiple processes, including social and political changes and the spread of nationalism.

In the visual arts, Romanticism first showed itself in landscape painting, where from as early as the 1760s British artists began to turn to wilder landscapes and storms, and Gothic architecture, even if they had to make do with Wales as a setting. Other groups of artists expressed feelings that verged on the mystical, many largely abandoning classical drawing and proportions. These included William Blake and Samuel Palmer and the other members of the Ancients in England, and in Germany Philipp Otto Runge. Like Friedrich, none of these artists had significant influence after their deaths for the rest of the 19th century, and were 20th century rediscoveries from obscurity, though Blake was always known as a poet, and Norway’s leading painter Johan Christian Dahl was heavily influenced by Friedrich. The Rome-based Nazarene movement of German artists, active from 1810, took a very different path, concentrating on medievalizing history paintings with religious and nationalist themes.

Silhouette Art

A silhouette is the image of a person, animal, object or scene represented as a solid shape of a single color, usually black, with its edges matching the outline of the subject. The interior of a silhouette is featureless, and the whole is typically presented on a light background, usually white, or none at all. The silhouette differs from an outline, which depicts the edge of an object in a linear form, while a silhouette appears as a solid shape. Silhouette images may be created in any visual artistic media, but was first used to describe pieces of cut paper, which were then stuck to a backing in a contrasting colour, and often framed. Cutting portraits, generally in profile, from black card became popular in the mid-18th century, though the term silhouette was seldom used until the early decades of the 19th century, and the tradition has continued under this name into the 21st century. They represented a cheap but effective alternative to the portrait miniature, and skilled specialist artists could cut a high-quality bust portrait, by far the most common style, in a matter of minutes, working purely by eye. Other artists, especially from about 1790, drew an outline on paper, then painted it in, which could be equally quick.

From its original graphic meaning, the term silhouette has been extended to describe the sight or representation of a person, object or scene that is backlit, and appears dark against a lighter background. Anything that appears this way, for example, a figure standing backlit in a doorway, may be described as “in silhouette”. Because a silhouette emphasises the outline, the word has also been used in the fields of fashion and fitness to describe the shape of a person’s body or the shape created by wearing clothing of a particular style or period. The discipline of architecture that studies the shadows cast by or upon buildings is called Sciography. The play of shadows upon buildings was very much in vogue a thousand years ago as evidenced by the surviving examples of “mukarnas” art where the shadows of 3 dimensional ornamentation with stone masonry around the entrance of mosques form pictures. As outright pictures were avoided in Islam, tessellations and calligraphic pictures were allowed, “accidental” silhouettes are a creative alternative.

Many photographers use the technique of photographing people, objects or landscape elements against the light, to achieve an image in silhouette. The background light might be natural, such as a cloudy or open sky, mist or fog, sunset or an open doorway (a technique known as contre-jour), or it might be contrived in a studio; see low-key lighting. Silhouetting requires that the exposure be adjusted so that there is no detail (underexposure) within the desired silhouette element, and overexposure for the background to render it bright; so a lighting ratio of 16:1 or greater is the ideal. The Zone System was an aid to film photographers in achieving the required exposure ratios. High contrast film, adjustment of film development, and/or high contrast photographic paper may be used in chemical-based photography to enhance the effect in the darkroom. With digital processing the contrast may be enhanced through the manipulation of the contrast curve for the image. In media the term “to silhouette” is used for the process of separating or masking a portion of an image (such as the background) so that it does not show. Traditionally silhouettes have often been used in advertising, particularly in poster design, because they can be cheaply and effectively printed.

Realism Art

Realism in the arts is the attempt to represent subject matter truthfully, without artificiality and avoiding artistic conventions, implausible, exotic and supernatural elements. Realism has been prevalent in the arts at many periods, and is in large part a matter of technique and training, and the avoidance of stylization. In the visual arts, illusionistic realism is the accurate depiction of lifeforms, perspective, and the details of light and colour. Realist works of art may emphasize the mundane, ugly or sordid, such as works of social realism, regionalism, or kitchen sink realism. There have been various realism movements in the arts, such as the opera style of verismo, literary realism, theatrical realism and Italian neorealist cinema. The realism art movement in painting began in France in the 1850s, after the 1848 Revolution. The realist painters rejected Romanticism, which had come to dominate French literature and art, with roots in the late 18th century.

Realism or naturalism as a style meaning the honest, unidealizing depiction of the subject, can of course be used in depicting any type of subject, without any commitment to treating the typical or everyday. Despite the general idealism of classical art, this too had classical precedents, which came in useful when defending such treatments in the Renaissance and Baroque. Demetrius of Alopece was a 4th-century BCE sculptor whose work (all now lost) was said to prefer realism over ideal beauty, and during the Ancient Roman Republic even politicians preferred a truthful depiction in portraits, though the early emperors favoured Greek idealism. Goya’s portraits of the Spanish royal family represent a sort of peak in the honest and downright unflattering portrayal of important persons.

The Realist movement began in the mid-19th century as a reaction to Romanticism and History painting. In favor of depictions of ‘real’ life, the Realist painters used common laborers, and ordinary people in ordinary surroundings engaged in real activities as subjects for their works. Its chief exponents were Gustave Courbet, Jean-François Millet, Honoré Daumier, and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. According to Ross Finocchio, formerly of the Department of European Paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Realists used unprettified detail depicting the existence of ordinary contemporary life, coinciding in the contemporaneous naturalist literature of Émile Zola, Honoré de Balzac, and Gustave Flaubert.

In the 19th century “Naturalism” or the “Naturalist school” was somewhat artificially erected as a term representing a breakaway sub-movement of Realism, that attempted (not wholly successfully) to distinguish itself from its parent by its avoidance of politics and social issues, and liked to proclaim a quasi-scientific basis, playing on the sense of “naturalist” as a student of Natural history, as the biological sciences were then generally known. The originator of the term was the French art critic Jules-Antoine Castagnary, who in 1863 announced that: “The naturalist school declares that art is the expression of life under all phases and on all levels, and that its sole aim is to reproduce nature by carrying it to its maximum power and intensity: it is truth balanced with science”. Émile Zola adopted the term with a similar scientific emphasis for his aims in the novel. Much Naturalist painting covered a similar range of subject matter as that of Impressionism, but using tighter, more traditional brushwork styles, and in landscapes often with more gloomy weather.

Abstract Art

Abstract art uses a visual language of shape, form, color and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world. Western art had been, from the Renaissance up to the middle of the 19th century, underpinned by the logic of perspective and an attempt to reproduce an illusion of visible reality. The arts of cultures other than the European had become accessible and showed alternative ways of describing visual experience to the artist. By the end of the 19th century many artists felt a need to create a new kind of art which would encompass the fundamental changes taking place in technology, science and philosophy. The sources from which individual artists drew their theoretical arguments were diverse, and reflected the social and intellectual preoccupations in all areas of Western culture at that time.

Abstract art, non-figurative art, non-objective art, and nonrepresentational art are loosely related terms. They are similar, but perhaps not of identical meaning.

Abstraction indicates a departure from reality in depiction of imagery in art. This departure from accurate representation can be slight, partial, or complete. Abstraction exists along a continuum. Even art that aims for verisimilitude of the highest degree can be said to be abstract, at least theoretically, since perfect representation is likely to be exceedingly elusive. Artwork which takes liberties, altering for instance color and form in ways that are conspicuous, can be said to be partially abstract. Total abstraction bears no trace of any reference to anything recognizable. In geometric abstraction, for instance, one is unlikely to find references to naturalistic entities. Figurative art and total abstraction are almost mutually exclusive. But figurative and representational (or realistic) art often contains partial abstraction.

Painting Random Geometric Abstract Art

  1. Create a textured background. One of the easiest ways to do this is to apply artist-quality Gesso, a thick gel-like primer. Apply it like paint, or spread it around with a palette knife, if it’s thick enough. This will allow you to control the style of the texture.
  2. Tape lines at intersecting points across the canvas. Use blue painter’s tape and place several lines, creating geometric shapes, such as triangles, squares, and rectangles. The goal is to create images that aren’t representative of reality. The taped lines will help you paint Painter’s tape will ensure that your painting has crisp, clear lines and shapes.
  3. Mix your paint colors. Decide which colors you’ll be using to complete your painting. Mix them on an artist’s palette or plate. You could also mix the colors directly on the canvas, but this will take away some control over the finished look.
  4. Paint in the spaces between the tape. Don’t worry if you happen to get paint on the painter’s tape. Also, don’t feel as though you must fill your entire canvas, or all of the shapes, with color.
  5. Remove the tape. As soon as you’ve decided the painting is complete, remove the painter’s tape. If you’d like crisp, clear edges, remove the tape while the paint is still wet. If you remove the tape from a dry painting, it’s liable to pull paint away with it, creating slightly rough edges.
  6. Fill in the blank space from the tape, optional. Once you remove the tape, you’ll notice white lines from where the tape was covering the canvas. While you can leave it, you could also paint the lines in.

Oil Paint

  1. Choose your paints. Before you can even consider oil painting, you must get oil paints. Although there are dozens of brands of oil paint on the market, don’t be drawn in by the attraction of budget supplies. Buying cheap, poor quality supplies will make your painting difficult, tedious, and frustrating. Paying a few dollars more will give you paints that require one coat instead of two or three for the same vibrancy and blend-ability.
  2. Get the rest of your materials. Beginning painters often fall under the tendency to avoid getting certain supplies to save money. While this is a perfectly all right practice, there are a few basic painting essentials you will need to make oil painting enjoyable and easy.
  3. Set up your work area. Because oil painting does require a lot of supplies, you will need a large area to use. Set up your easel or table in an area that is away from foot traffic and direct sunlight, if possible. If you have one, lay a drop cloth down to prevent any paint spills from ruining your floors.
  4. Create a rough sketch. Use a hard pencil to create a light sketch of your subject. You can do this directly onto the canvas or onto tracing paper, and transfer it using a carbon copy. When you’re drawing your subject, keep in mind the composition and use of negative space.
  5. Find the light source. To create a realistic painting, you must have obvious patches of light and dark. Look at your subject and determine the angle at which the light is coming from, and where shadows and highlights are located.
  6. Consider your colors. For new painters, it is often very difficult to match the colors of their subject to the colors they mix with their paint. This is because the brain provides an idealized color value; you see the sky is blue, so you mix blue paint, only to realize that your paint is much brighter and colorful than the actual sky. The trick is to get past the symbols of color our brain uses, and examine the actual colors being used. This will change the brightness of your paints.
  7. Look at the movement of your subject. Are you painting a still life with little to no movement? Or is your figure in a field on a windy day, creating a lot of motion? Paying attention to the movement of your subject is important for planning your brush strokes. Realistic paintings have brush strokes that create movement, or a lack thereof.
  8. Mix your paints. Oil paint is extremely forgiving in the sense that it takes many days to begin to dry. However, it is nearly impossible to mix the same paint twice so mix your paints in large batches and preserve between painting sessions so that you always have enough of the right color.
  9. Begin painting. You can choose whatever painting technique you like, whether that be painting entire sections to completion or putting layers of paint over the entire canvas. When oil painting, though, use the thin-to-thick method in which you paint with thin paint before using thick paint.
  10. Try different techniques. There are dozens of ways to perfect your painting, but learning them all as a beginner can be overwhelming. instead, focus on picking up some of these techniques one at a time
  11. Correct any mistakes. You have about three days (while the oil paint is wet on the canvas) when you can alter any mistakes or remove them completely with a damp rag. Before you decide the painting is complete, take a step back and look at your painting in its totality to see if any changes are needed.
  12. Save unused paint. If you have a lot of paint left on your palette that was not used, save it for your next painting. Scoop it into small containers or into piles on your palette and cover with saran wrap.
  13. Clean your paint brushes. Oil paint will ruin your brushes if it is allowed to dry, so clean your brushes immediately after use. Use turpentine and an old rag to wipe away as much of the paint as you can then rinse them under warm water with a little washing up liquid. You can brush the bristles against the palm of your hand to make sure all the paint has been removed. Put the clean brushes, bristle-end up, in a jar or cup to dry. Make sure that the brushes get adequate air circulation until they dry: Put your brushes them in an open area– on a shelf or desk, for example, not in a closed cabinet or drawer.
  14. Wait. For oil paint to dry completely, it may take up to 3 months, even longer if your painting has many thick layers of paint. Put your painting where it won’t be disturbed or damaged and allow it to air dry for the necessary time.
  15. Add a coat of varnish. When your painting has dried completely, add a coat of varnish to protect it and preserve the color. When the protective varnish has dried, you’re done! Hang your beautiful creation for all to see!

Create a Neopoprealist Art Work

NeoPopRealism is a style of art that aims to combine the simplicity of modern pop art with the philosophical depth of realism. This style of art does have its “rules,” but it is largely focused on creating artwork that is unique to the individual. To create a NeoPopRealism art work, learn about the style, practice it, and then work on a simple project until you are ready to create work that stems purely from your own imagination.

  1. Doodle on a piece of paper. You don’t have to feel very familiar with the style to begin practicing. Take out a blank piece of paper and a pencil. Begin to doodle. Don’t think about what you’re doodling. Right now, the goal is to open up your mind and forget restrictions. It’s not important if your doodle resembles other NeoPopRealist works for now.
  2. Create a sketch after you’ve doodled for a while. Once you’ve created several doodles, create a sketch. Basically, you should use the lines to create the shape and sections. Then, fill the sections with different patterns and ornaments. If you can’t think of what to draw, draw a line that resembles the profile of a face. Then, draw the basic features of that face with loose lines and shapes.
  3. Use a pen to draw your sketch. Nadia Russ recommends using a pen to draw in this style so that you can’t erase what you’ve created. After creating a sketch, take out another piece of paper. Use a pen to draw what you’ve sketched. It’s okay if the drawing looks different from what you’ve sketched or if you make mistakes. Do not give up until you feel the drawing is complete.
  4. Draw several patterns. You can dive into creating the egg if you’d like, but it’s okay to start by generating ideas by drawing patterns. Take out a piece of paper and a pencil. Fill the paper with several separate and unique patterns. You can use the patterns to fill in your egg when you’re ready.
  5. Draw an egg shape on paper. Once you’ve come up with some patterns, draw the shape of an egg on a piece of paper. You should only draw the basic outline, and the inside of the “egg” should be empty. It’s okay if the shape isn’t perfect, but you can redraw it if you aren’t happy with the first shape.
  6. Fill the egg with lines and patterns. Now, fill the egg with several different, unique patterns by using a pen. You can put some thought into this or do it entirely without putting conscious effort into what you’re drawing. If you want some structure, section your egg off by drawing several lines so that you create “spaces” for your patterns. Then, fill those spaces with patterns like the ones you practiced. Don’t stop until the entire egg has been filled—unless you want to leave white space.
  7. Paint your pattern onto a wooden egg. Your artwork can be finished when you complete the egg on paper, or you can use that egg as a base for a wooden egg. If so, take a wooden egg and acrylic paint in the colors of your choice. Use a thin paintbrush to paint patterns all over the wooden egg. Wait a few minutes for the paint to dry and then finish by spraying it with a clear varnish.

Title Work of Art

Giving a title to a work of art can be a very complicated process, as it reveals another layer of meaning for the artwork. Conveying the right sense in the right combination of words can be difficult. There is no tried-and-true method of naming a work of art, but there are strategies and exercises that can help you pinpoint the best name to represent your hard work and creativity. This article will help you to find that perfect name.

  1. Make a list of themes central to the artwork. Brainstorm a list of ideas that reflect what your artwork is about. It can be simple, such as “trees” or “girl,” but it can also be thematic or subconscious, such as “friendship” or “childhood.” Think about what the meaning of the artwork is, and how the title can convey that meaning.
  2. Identify your motivation behind the artwork. What drove you to create this piece of art? Reflect on your feelings about this artwork and what you’d like to share with your audience. How does the artwork make you feel? Identify the story you want to tell.
  3. Pinpoint the artwork’s focal point. With artwork, there are certain areas of the piece that the artist wants the audience to see first or to pay the most attention to. Think about the focal point of your artwork. What do you want people to focus on when they observe your artwork? Naming your artwork after the focal point can help people understand your artwork better.
  4. Consider what audiences need to know. Oftentimes, titles help audiences understand what they’re looking at. Titles can give tools to the audience to know how to interpret the piece. What do you want audiences to know about your artwork?
    • Do you want your title to direct the viewer towards a particular interpretation? For example, a work of art of a dog sitting on a beach can be interpreted in a number of ways. But if you title the picture, “Abandoned,” the viewer will assume that the dog has been abandoned on the beach. If you title the picture, “Best Friend,” people will react differently to the dog’s presence.
    • Some artists prefer not to tell the meaning of their artwork, deliberately leaving the title ambiguous.
  5. Make the title meaningful for yourself. No matter your reasoning for choosing a particular title, make it meaningful for you. You are, after all, the artist, and the artwork is made primarily for yourself. Some artists like to have titles that convey certain meanings so that they remember certain details about the process of making the artwork, what inspired the artwork, and so on.