Graffiti Art

Graffiti are writing or drawings that have been scribbled, scratched, or painted illicitly on a wall or other surface, often within public view. Graffiti range from simple written words to elaborate wall paintings, and they have existed since ancient times, with examples dating back to Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, and the Roman Empire. In modern times, paint (particularly spray paint) and marker pens have become the most commonly used graffiti materials. In most countries, marking or painting property without the property owner’s permission is considered defacement and vandalism, which is a punishable crime.

Graffiti may also express underlying social and political messages and a whole genre of artistic expression is based upon spray paint graffiti styles. Within hip hop culture, graffiti have evolved alongside hip hop music, b-boying, and other elements. Unrelated to hip-hop graffiti, gangs use their own form of graffiti to mark territory or to serve as an indicator of gang-related activities. Controversies that surround graffiti continue to create disagreement amongst city officials, law enforcement, and writers who wish to display and appreciate work in public locations.

Doodle

A doodle is a drawing made while a person’s attention is otherwise occupied. Doodles are simple drawings that can have concrete representational meaning or may just be composed of random and abstract lines, generally without ever lifting the drawing device off of the paper, in which case it is usually called a “scribble”.

Doodling and scribbling are most often associated with young children and toddlers, because their lack of hand–eye coordination and lower mental development often make it very difficult for any young child to keep their coloring attempts within the line art of the subject. Despite this, it is not uncommon to see such behaviour with adults, in which case it generally is done jovially, out of boredom. Typical examples of doodling are found in school notebooks, often in the margins, drawn by students daydreaming or losing interest during class. Other common examples of doodling are produced during long telephone conversations if a pen and paper are available. Popular kinds of doodles include cartoon versions of teachers or companions in a school, famous TV or comic characters, invented

Silhouette Art

A silhouette is the image of a person, animal, object or scene represented as a solid shape of a single color, usually black, with its edges matching the outline of the subject. The interior of a silhouette is featureless, and the whole is typically presented on a light background, usually white, or none at all. The silhouette differs from an outline, which depicts the edge of an object in a linear form, while a silhouette appears as a solid shape. Silhouette images may be created in any visual artistic media, but was first used to describe pieces of cut paper, which were then stuck to a backing in a contrasting colour, and often framed. Cutting portraits, generally in profile, from black card became popular in the mid-18th century, though the term silhouette was seldom used until the early decades of the 19th century, and the tradition has continued under this name into the 21st century. They represented a cheap but effective alternative to the portrait miniature, and skilled specialist artists could cut a high-quality bust portrait, by far the most

Geometric abstraction

Geometric abstraction is a form of abstract art based on the use of geometric forms sometimes, though not always, placed in non-illusionistic space and combined into non-objective (non-representational) compositions. Although the genre was popularized by avant-garde artists in the early twentieth century, similar motifs have been used in art since ancient times. Geometric abstraction is present among many cultures throughout history both as decorative motifs and as art pieces themselves. Islamic art, in its prohibition of depicting religious figures, is a prime example of this geometric pattern-based art, which existed centuries before the movement in Europe and in many ways influenced this Western school. Aligned with and often used in the architecture of Islamic civilations spanning the 7th century-20th century, geometric patterns were used to visually connect spirituality with science and art, both of which were key to Islamic thought of the time.

How to Do a Cubist Style Painting

Pick kid friendly art materials. You want to choose materials that kids will find easy to work with and that won’t create a large mess.

  • Washable acrylic paints work well for painting with kids. You can also create a “painting” masterpiece with markers, crayons, or

Romanticism

Romanticism (also the Romantic era or the Romantic period) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Romanticism was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical. It was partly a reaction to the Industrial Revolution, the aristocratic social and political norms of the Age of Enlightenment, and the scientific rationalization of nature—all components of modernity. It was embodied most strongly in the visual arts, music, and literature, but had a major impact on historiography, education, and the natural sciences. It had a significant and complex effect on politics, and while for much of the Romantic period it was associated with liberalism and radicalism, its long-term effect on the growth of nationalism was perhaps more significant.

The movement emphasized intense emotion as an authentic source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as apprehension, horror and terror, and awe—especially that experienced in confronting the new aesthetic categories of the sublimity and beauty of nature. It

Realism Art

Realism in the arts is the attempt to represent subject matter truthfully, without artificiality and avoiding artistic conventions, implausible, exotic and supernatural elements. Realism has been prevalent in the arts at many periods, and is in large part a matter of technique and training, and the avoidance of stylization. In the visual arts, illusionistic realism is the accurate depiction of lifeforms, perspective, and the details of light and colour. Realist works of art may emphasize the mundane, ugly or sordid, such as works of social realism, regionalism, or kitchen sink realism. There have been various realism movements in the arts, such as the opera style of verismo, literary realism, theatrical realism and Italian neorealist cinema. The realism art movement in painting began in France in the 1850s, after the 1848 Revolution. The realist painters rejected Romanticism, which had come to dominate French literature and art, with roots in the late 18th century.

Realism or naturalism as a style meaning the honest, unidealizing depiction of the subject, can of course be used in depicting any type of subject, without any commitment to treating the typical or everyday. Despite the general idealism of classical art, this too had classical precedents,

Abstract Art

Abstract art uses a visual language of shape, form, color and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from visual references in the world. Western art had been, from the Renaissance up to the middle of the 19th century, underpinned by the logic of perspective and an attempt to reproduce an illusion of visible reality. The arts of cultures other than the European had become accessible and showed alternative ways of describing visual experience to the artist. By the end of the 19th century many artists felt a need to create a new kind of art which would encompass the fundamental changes taking place in technology, science and philosophy. The sources from which individual artists drew their theoretical arguments were diverse, and reflected the social and intellectual preoccupations in all areas of Western culture at that time.

Abstract art, non-figurative art, non-objective art, and nonrepresentational art are loosely related terms. They are similar, but perhaps not of identical meaning.

Abstraction indicates a departure from reality in depiction of imagery in art. This departure from accurate representation can be slight, partial, or complete. Abstraction exists along a continuum. Even art that aims

Oil Paint

  1. Choose your paints. Before you can even consider oil painting, you must get oil paints. Although there are dozens of brands of oil paint on the market, don’t be drawn in by the attraction of budget supplies. Buying cheap, poor quality supplies will make your painting difficult, tedious, and frustrating. Paying a few dollars more will give you paints that require one coat instead of two or three for the same vibrancy and blend-ability.
  2. Get the rest of your materials. Beginning painters often fall under the tendency to avoid getting certain supplies to save money. While this is a perfectly all right practice, there are a few basic painting essentials you will need to make oil painting enjoyable and easy.
  3. Set up your work area. Because oil painting does require a lot of supplies, you will need a large area to use. Set up your easel or table in an area that is away from foot traffic and direct sunlight, if possible. If you have one, lay a drop cloth down to prevent any paint spills from ruining your floors.
  4. Create a rough sketch. Use a hard pencil to create a light sketch of your

Create a Neopoprealist Art Work

NeoPopRealism is a style of art that aims to combine the simplicity of modern pop art with the philosophical depth of realism. This style of art does have its “rules,” but it is largely focused on creating artwork that is unique to the individual. To create a NeoPopRealism art work, learn about the style, practice it, and then work on a simple project until you are ready to create work that stems purely from your own imagination.

  1. Doodle on a piece of paper. You don’t have to feel very familiar with the style to begin practicing. Take out a blank piece of paper and a pencil. Begin to doodle. Don’t think about what you’re doodling. Right now, the goal is to open up your mind and forget restrictions. It’s not important if your doodle resembles other NeoPopRealist works for now.
  2. Create a sketch after you’ve doodled for a while. Once you’ve created several doodles, create a sketch. Basically, you should use the lines to create the shape and sections. Then, fill the sections with different patterns and ornaments. If you can’t think of what to draw, draw a line that resembles the profile of a face.

Title Work of Art

Giving a title to a work of art can be a very complicated process, as it reveals another layer of meaning for the artwork. Conveying the right sense in the right combination of words can be difficult. There is no tried-and-true method of naming a work of art, but there are strategies and exercises that can help you pinpoint the best name to represent your hard work and creativity. This article will help you to find that perfect name.

  1. Make a list of themes central to the artwork. Brainstorm a list of ideas that reflect what your artwork is about. It can be simple, such as “trees” or “girl,” but it can also be thematic or subconscious, such as “friendship” or “childhood.” Think about what the meaning of the artwork is, and how the title can convey that meaning.
  2. Identify your motivation behind the artwork. What drove you to create this piece of art? Reflect on your feelings about this artwork and what you’d like to share with your audience. How does the artwork make you feel? Identify the story you want to tell.
  3. Pinpoint the artwork’s focal point. With artwork, there are certain areas

Value Your Art

Part 1 > Looking at the Art It self
  • Research the artist’s output. How many works of art did the artist complete? The output of the artist in general greatly affects price. Prolific artists’ pieces of work tend to be less valuable than those of artists who simply produced less, all things being equal.
  • Find out if there are duplicates. Is the work one-of-a-kind? Because of supply and demand, works that are singular are worth more than replicated works. For this reason, a paintings is usually worth more than a print or a lithograph — there are simply fewer of them out on the market.
  • Pinpoint when in the artist’s career the work was completed. Was the work completed early on or toward the twilight of their career? Interestingly enough, works of art completed early in artists’ careers are usually valued higher than those completed later on.
  • Ask yourself if the work epitomizes the artist’s style. Works of art that epitomize an artist’s aesthetic are usually appraised higher than works of art that are tangential or not representative of the artist’s oeuvre.
  • Investigate whether the artist is well-known or has a reputation. Artists generally fall into three

Arts and Entertainment

How to Become a Famous Artist

Your dream of becoming a famous artist may not be as far-fetched as it might seem: child prodigy Sir John Everett Millais was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite movement, and won a silver medal at the Society of Arts at age nine. Also, Pablo Picasso, co-founder of the Cubist movement, was regarded as a boy genius. Even today, young artists such as Akiane Kramarik are heralded as prodigies. If you have what it takes, your name may be destined to be remembered throughout the ages.

Practice. Being called by the muse is a wonderful thing, without a doubt, but without the technical abilities to realize your vision, you won’t get very far. Whatever your chosen medium or media, become an expert in every part of it.

  • Set aside an hour or more each day to devote to nothing but practicing your technique.
  • Focus especially on those areas that are the weakest for you, but build your strengths as well.
  • Take advantage of the communities and resources that you can find. Artist supply manufacturers, and art stores themselves, often have free literature, tutorials, videos, and websites that are loaded with tips, techniques, and more.
  • Some

Difference Between Art and Design

The subject of what separates art and design is convoluted and has been debated for a long time. Artists and designers both create visual compositions using a shared knowledge base, but their reasons for doing so are entirely different. Some designers consider themselves artists, but few artists consider themselves designers. So what exactly is the difference between art and design? In this post, we’ll examine and compare some of the core principles of each craft. This is a subject that people have strong opinions about, and I’m looking forward to reading the various points of view in the comments.

This post isn’t a definitive guide, but rather the starting point for a conversation, so let’s be open-minded! Perhaps the most fundamental difference between art and design that we can all agree on is their purposes. Typically, the process of creating a work of art starts with nothing, a blank canvas. A work of art stems from a view or opinion or feeling that the artist holds within him or herself. They create the art to share that feeling with others, to allow the viewers to relate to it, learn from it or be inspired by it.

Art Economics

Economics of the arts and literature or cultural economics (used below for convenience) is a branch of economics that studies the economics of creation, distribution, and the consumption of works of art, literature and similar creative and/or cultural products. For a long time, the concept of the “arts” were confined to visual arts (e.g., painting) and performing arts (music, theatre, dance) in the Anglo-Saxon tradition. Usage has widened since the beginning of the 1980s with the study of cultural industry (cinema, television programs, book and periodical publishing and music publishing) and the economy of cultural institutions (museums, libraries, historic buildings). The field is coded as JEL: Z11 in the Journal of Economic Literature classification system used for article searches.

Cultural economics is concerned with the arts in a broad sense. The goods considered have creative content, but that is not enough to qualify as a cultural good. Designer goods such as clothes and drapes are not considered usually to be works of art or culture. Cultural goods are those with a value determined by symbolic content rather than physical characteristics. (For further considerations, see also Cultural Institutions Studies). Economic thinking has been applied in ever more areas

Powerful Works of Public Art in the World

The history of powerful public iconography is long—and fraught. Here are eight works across the world that startled audiences and began other important political discussions.

Banksy’s Flying Balloons Girl

Roll your eyes if you will at the still-anonymous artist’s provocations—they do grab attention. An early, powerful work of Banksy’s, Flying Balloons Girl, uses the trope of the innocuous young girl, much as the bronze Wall Street sculpture does. The stenciled work of a young girl such as you might see in an old time-y children’s book appeared in 2005. She’s holding tight to a bunch of balloons as they begin to carry her afloat. But in Flying Balloons she’s spray-painted onto the wall in the West Bank that separates the Palestinian Territories and Israel.

Pussy Riot’s Punk Prayer

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alyokhina, and Yekaterina Samutsevich—better known as Pussy Riot—were arrested in 2012 after disrupting a church service in Moscow. The impromptu performance of the band’s song “Punk Prayer,” in which they shout “Mother Mary, please drive Putin away,” protests the Russian Orthodox Church’s support for Russia’s president, whom the trio see as an imperialist autocrat. The feminist band was sentenced to two years in prison on the charge of

How to Make a Mind Map

Sometimes coming up with ideas for an Art project takes place within the classroom – an interactive discussion between students and teachers; on other occasions students formally document ideas within their sketchbooks. Humans have a tendency to think in a multi-dimensional way – that is, with lots of things occurring simultaneously, triggering further ideas. Rather than attempting to record thoughts in a sequential, linear fashion (i.e. writing these down in lists or paragraphs), students can find it helpful to collect, record and organise ideas graphically, using visual diagram such as a mind map. If this brainstorm is submitted as part of assessment material, it is essential that this is presented well.

Guidelines for Art Students

When brainstorming ideas for a high school Art project, remember that:

  • Single words are unlikely to express an idea adequately. As you think though possibilities, it is likely that you will want to jot down whole phrases and brainstorm possible ways of beginning or approaching a subject. Intentions and possibilities should be clear to someone else who reads the mind map at a later date
  • Images should be sourced first-hand (i.e. drawn or photographed yourself) or clearly referenced, and should be

Important Steps You Can Take to Ace High School Art

People often think that high-achieving Art or Design students are blessed with a gift: bestowed with a creative talent since birth. You might be surprised to learn that those who excel in high school Art often excel in a wide range of other subjects too – that it is not so much a creative gift that they possess, but rather a practical understanding of howto succeed. Every day thousands of skilful Art students underachieve, while others slowly and steadily inch their achievement levels higher and higher.

1. Dream of success

Most people spend their days fretting about the past or worrying about the future. They carry around an inner critic that belittles their skill, intellect, appearance, decisions, actions and worth as a person. The human capacity for anticipating the future based on the events of the past has resulted in us dominating the planet; it is also the leading of cause of misery. If you are depressed, worried or anxious, read The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle (Amazon affiliate link). He will remind you that what has already happened has gone and will only ever exist as a memory experienced in your mind now. Similarly, the future is an imaginary

How to Create an excellent Observational Drawing

Observational drawing is an integral component of many high school Art courses, including GCSE/IGCSE and A Level Art. Often, drawing is the core method of researching, investigating, developing and communicating ideas. While it is accepted that there are many wondrous types of drawings – and that non-representational drawing methods have an important role in student Art projects – it is usually advantageous to demonstrate competent, realistic observational drawing skills to the examiner (particularly in the early stage of a project).

Tip 1: Look at what you are drawing

Failing to look at what you are drawing is one of the most fundamental errors an Art student can make. This sounds obvious, but it is the most common error made by art students. Many students attempt to draw things the way that they think they should look, rather than the way they actually do look. The only way to record shape, proportion and detail accurately is to look at the source of information. Human memory does not suffice. Forms, shadows and details are hard enough to replicate when they are right there in front of you; if you have to make them up, they appear even less convincing. In order to produce an

Coloring Book Creativity

Tips for creative ways to color adult coloring book pages

1. Make it a zentangle

By using ink, you can color in the page using different pen strokes like hatching and cross hatching and tiny patterns to create an intricate coloring wonderland. Before you know it, the page will completely change character, becoming almost like a collaborative work between you and the coloring book page illustrator.

2. Use paint

Using paint instead of pencils or crayons can make coloring a totally new experience. In the above photo, watercolor is used to apply a delicate, translucent tone to the coloring book page, giving it a soft effect and a different character than a page colored in with crayon or colored pencil. Watercolor isn’t your only option; you could use gouache or acrylic, too (oil paint is not suggested). For best results, remove the coloring book page from the book before painting so the paint doesn’t warp the pages below or seep through. Using removable tape, affix it to a rigid work surface to prevent buckling of the page as you paint.

3. Create lush layers

Working in layers, you can create a lush, soft effect in

Art World

The art world comprises everyone involved in producing, commissioning, presenting, preserving, promoting, chronicling, criticizing, and selling fine art. Art world is indeed a wider term than art market, though that is a large part of it. Howard S. Becker describes it as “the network of people whose cooperative activity, organized via their joint knowledge of conventional means of doing things, produce(s) the kind of art works that art world is noted for” (Becker, 1982). In her book, Seven Days in the Art World, Sarah Thornton describes it as “a loose network of overlapping subcultures held together by a belief in art. They span the globe but cluster in art capitals like New York, London, Los Angeles, and Berlin.” Other cities sometimes called “art capitals” include Beijing, Brussels, Hong Kong, Miami, Paris, Rome and Tokyo; due to their large art festivals, followings, and being the centers of art production.

The notion of the singular art world is problematic, since Becker and others show art worlds are, instead, independent multiplicities scattered worldwide that are always in flux: there is no “center” to the art world any more. In her analysis of the “net art world” (referring to network-aided art or net